Prandium exposed

UPDATE: The photo has been changed as of September 02008.

If you’re wondering, and since folks have asked, perhaps you are.. What is that a picture of at the top of my site? When I first read about prandium* early last autumn I was eating this dish pretty much every day. It is..

Yoghurt with goodness on top

Spoon about a cup of nonfat plain yoghurt into your favourite little bowl..

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Chop eleven or thirteen whole shelled walnuts. These go on top of the yoghurt..

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Drizzle your favourite honey allover and around the walnuts..

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Sprinkle a pinch of kosher salt (not pictured)..

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Buen provecho..

*During the Roman Republic the prandium was the midday meal and is somewhat akin to our lunch. According to some sources, during the era Roman citizens ate two meals a day—the prandium and the cena. You may be more familiar with the cena; it was the Roman banquet. My interest lies with the prandium. It was a frugal and sustaining meal based on bread—the staff of life—and was eaten with (or without) figs, dates, nuts, fresh fruits, vegetables, and leftovers from the previous night’s cena, which may include meat. Otherwise, folks then typically did not eat meat alone. The prandium was eaten alone, when and where it suited oneself. Without turning this into an essay (which I am still writing), I believe the prandium has qualities relevant on several grounds, to many of the food dilemmas challenging us today—eating alone, eating well and healthy, eating what tastes great, what is affordable and available, and eating what thinks about its place within its greater ecology (food systems, environment, etc..). Thus, Daily Prandium (.com).

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